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This article was written by Skant Gupta and Joel Perez in Oracle OTN.

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This method can be used only if the on-premises platform is little endian, and the database character sets of your on-premises database and Oracle Database Cloud Service database are compatible.

To migrate an Oracle Database 12c PDB to a PDB in an Oracle Database 12c database on an Oracle Database Cloud Service deployment using the RMAN cross-platform transportable PDB method, you perform these tasks:

  1. On the on-premises database host, invoke SQL*Plus and close the on-premises PDB.
  2. On the on-premises database host, execute the ALTER PLUGGABLE DATABASE UNPLUG command to generate an XML file containing the list of datafiles that will be plugged in on the cloud database.
  3. On the on-premises database host, invoke RMAN and connect to the root. Execute the BACKUP FOR TRANSPORT PLUGGABLE DATABASE command.
  4. Creating the Database Cloud Service database.
  5. Use a secure copy utility to transfer the XML file and the backup set to the Database Cloud Service compute node.
  6. On the Database Cloud Service compute node, invoke RMAN and connect to the root. Execute the RESTORE ALL FOREIGN DATAFILES command.
  7. The Database Cloud Service compute node, invoke SQL*Plus and connect to the root. Execute the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE command.
  8. The Database Cloud Service compute node, execute the ALTER PLUGGABLE DATABASE OPEN command.

On-premises database to Cloud Using RMAN Cross-Platform Transportable PDB: Example

This example is to migrate an On-premises database to Cloud Using RMAN Cross-Platform Transportable PDB

In this example, the on-premises database is on a Linux host.

1.- On the on-premises database host, invoke SQL*Plus and close the on-premises PDB.

[oracle@cloud ~]$ sqlplus / as sysdba

SQL*Plus: Release 12.1.0.2.0 Production on Sun Jun 4 11:47:11 2017

Copyright (c) 1982, 2014, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Connected to:

Oracle Database 12c Enterprise Edition Release 12.1.0.2.0 - 64bit Production

With the Partitioning, OLAP, Advanced Analytics and Real Application Testing options

SQL>

If you want to read rest to the article, go across this link :Migration “On-prem” database to Cloud Using RMAN Cross-Platform Transportable PDB

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Today we’re going to recap some of the most interesting concepts from the recently completed Oracle OpenWorld 2017 and to help us navigate this I have invited Simon Pane back to the show. Simon is an accomplished Principal Consultant, who has developed a multitude of complex solutions for Pythian clients. He leverages his understanding of the industry and technologies such as Oracle, SQL Server, Linux, Oracle Cloud, AWS and more, to propose timely solutions that best suit the needs of clients. Also joining us for the first time is Ivica Arsov. Ivica is an Oracle Certified Master 12c and 11g, and a recognized member of the Oracle ACE Program as an Oracle ACE Associate. He is a blogger and active contributor to the Oracle community and presents at many technology conferences. Known for his deep Oracle expertise and ability to troubleshoot quickly and efficiently, Ivica has the skills to solve problems quickly regardless of size and complexity. Keep listening to hear more!


Key points from this episode:

  • Simon tells us more about his career at Pythian and the work he is doing with Oracle.
  • Ivica shares with us on the work he is doing with Oracle while working at Pythian.
  • The atmosphere at OOW this year.
  • The common theme of automation and security.
  • Competitive threats versus security threats.
  • The new version of the Oracle database, 18c.
  • Improvements in reduction of danger surrounding patching by balancing risk.
  • The new autonomous feature and the NRX guarantee.
  • Elasticity and automatic scaling.
  • DBA’s focusing on tasks specific to the business in the world of automation.
  • The trade-off of simplicity versus index.
  • Machine learning being introduced with cyber security.
  • New features coming out with 18c and 19c releases and architecture versions.
  • Understanding how customers are at the mercy of vendors.
  • Certifications bundled to a number of versions.
  • Industry problems around tools and security assessment.
  • Hear more about Ivica and some of his favorites in the lightning round.
  • Simon tells us more about the UK Oracle User Group Conference taking place.
  • And much more!

Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:

Oracle OpenWorld 2017
Simon Pane
Ivica Arsov
Pythian
Amazon 
Microsoft
Oracle
Microsoft Azure
Dataguard
Rac
The book, Transaction Processing: Concepts and Techniques
UK Oracle User Group

Project Fn is an open source project that provides a container native, poly-language, cloud agnostic (aka run on any cloud) serverless platform for running functions. Fn was launched during Oracle OpenWorld 2017. Fn is available on GitHub (https://github.com/fnproject/fn ) and provides all resources required to get started. In this article, I will just show you (and myself) how I went through the quick start steps and what it looked like on my laptop (Windows 10 with Vagrant and VirtualBox).

I simply get Fn up and running, create a first function that I then deploy and access through HTTP. I briefly show the APIs available on the Fn server and Fn UI application.

Steps:

  1. Create VirtualBox VM with Debian and Docker (for me, Ubuntu 14 failed to run Fn; I created issue 437 for that) – this step is described in a different article
  2. Install Fn command line
  3. Install and run Fn server in the VM, as Docker container
  4. Create function hello
  5. Initialize new function and run it
  6. Deploy the new function (in its own Docker Container running inside the container running Fn server)
  7. Invoke the new function over http from the Host laptop
  8. Run the Fn UI application
  9. Inspect the Fn Server REST APIs

Connect into the Debian Virtual Machine – for me with vagrant ssh.

Install Fn Command Line

To install the Fn command line, I used this command:

curl -LSs https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fnproject/cli/master/install | sh

image 

Install and run Fn server in the VM, as Docker container

To run the Fn server, after installing the CLI, I just used

fn start

image

Fn Server is running.

Create function hello

As per the instructions in the quick start guide, I created a new directory hello with a text file hello.go:

SNAGHTML2859e5fa

Note: I created these on the host laptop inside the directory that is mapped into the VM under /vagrant. So I can access the file inside the VM in /vagrant/hello.

Initialize new function and run it

image

and after a little while

image

Deploy the new function

(in its own Docker Container running inside the container running Fn server)

image

image

Run function inside Debian VM:

image

Invoke the new function over http from the Host laptop

image

The IP address 192.168.188.102 was assigned during the provisioning of the VM with Vagrant.

Run the Fn UI application

A UI application to inspect all Fn applications and functions can be installed and ran:

image

image

And accessed from the host laptop:

image

Note: for me it did not show the details for my new hello function.

Inspect the Fn Server REST APIs

Fn platform publishes REST APIs that can be used to programmatically learn more about applications and functions and also to manipulate those.

image

Some examples:

image

and

image

Summary

Getting started with Fn is pretty smooth. I got started and wrote this article in under an hour and a half. I am looking forward to doing much more with Fn – especially tying functions together using Fn Flow.

Resources

Fn project home page: http://fnproject.io/

Article to quickly provision VirtualBox Image with Debian and Docker: https://technology.amis.nl/2017/10/19/create-debian-vm-with-docker-host-using-vagrant-automatically-include-guest-additions/

Fn quick start guide: https://github.com/fnproject/fn 

Fn UI on GitHub: https://github.com/fnproject/ui 

Fn API: http://petstore.swagger.io/?url=https://raw.githubusercontent.com/fnproject/fn/master/docs/swagger.yml

The post Rapid first few steps with Fn – open source project for serverless functions appeared first on AMIS Oracle and Java Blog.

A short and simple article. I needed a Debian VM that I could use as Docker host – to run on my Windows 10 laptop. I resorted to Vagrant. With a few very simple steps, I got what I wanted:

0. install Vagrant (if not already done)

0. install Vagrant plugin for automatically adding Virtual Box Guest Additions to every VM stamped out by Vagrant (so folder mapping from host laptop to VM is supported)

image

1. create a fresh directory with a simple Vagrant file that refers for Debian image

2. run vagrant up

3. sit back and relax (few minutes)

4. use vagrant ssh to connect into the running VM and start doing stuff.

The vagrant file:

Vagrant.configure(“2”) do |config|
 
config.vm.provision “docker”

config.vm.define “debiandockerhostvm”
# https://app.vagrantup.com/debian/boxes/jessie64
config.vm.box = “debian/jessie64”
config.vm.network “private_network”, ip: “192.168.188.102”
 

config.vm.synced_folder “./”, “/vagrant”, id: “vagrant-root”,
       owner: “vagrant”,
       group: “www-data”,
       mount_options: [“dmode=775,fmode=664”],
       type: “”
        
config.vm.provider :virtualbox do |vb|
   vb.name = “debiandockerhostvm”
   vb.memory = 4096
   vb.cpus = 2
   vb.customize [“modifyvm”, :id, “–natdnshostresolver1”, “on”]
   vb.customize [“modifyvm”, :id, “–natdnsproxy1”, “on”]
end
 
end

Running Vagrant to create and subsequently run the VM:

image

image

Use vagrant ssh to enter the Virtual Machine and start mucking around:

image

Resources

Vagrant Plugin for automatically installing Guest Addition to each VM that is produced: https://github.com/dotless-de/vagrant-vbguest/

Vagrant Box Jessie: https://app.vagrantup.com/debian/boxes/jessie64

The post Create Debian VM with Docker Host using Vagrant–automatically include Guest Additions appeared first on AMIS Oracle and Java Blog.

Version 17.3(.1!) is Now Available - 18-Oct-2017 09:46 - Jeff Smith

We released SQL Developer version 17.3 while I was at Oracle Open World, so I didn’t have time to really blog it.

Plus, we found this REALLY annoying bug.

Some weird behavior too where you couldn’t click/put your cursor inside of commented code as well.

Obviously this was ‘no bueno’ – so we put out a patch.

Version 17.3.1 is available now.

What’s New in 17.3?

Mostly bug fixes. We identified issues from 17.2 and fixed those – thanks again Community folks!

A few improvements.

Code Outline
It wasn’t working for some larger code samples. That should be fixed now.

You’ll notice too that you should be able to click in your code and see the outline update position, and vice versa.

Formatter
Again, more tweaks based on community feedback. You can check out the 17.3 release notes to see exactly what.

You complained, provided test cases, we listened! That’s how it works.

ERD Relationship Labels

You can position labels above or below the line. As you move the lines around, it should respect the setting and remain visible.

A New Trick

Don’t you hate it when folks make you copy the line numbers for their code?

What About Java 9?

It’s officially released now. But we don’t support it yet. Why? It’s brand new, and came out at the end of the dev time for v17.3 – too late to properly test and certify it.

But, you can run it, and it’ll work just fine. I’ve been running it for a few months now. You’ll get a warning message on startup, just click the ‘ignore’ button and continue on. If you find a bug and report it to MOS, and they ask version of Java…back down to 8 and make sure the bug is still there too. Or, you’re on your own.

Official support will be available, soon.

What’s Coming in version 17.4?

We hate bugs. So we’re spending time killing as many now as possible. We’re also doing more Cloud work. You’ll see a better Cart, even for on-premises work, and you’ll see some improvements with managing your connections. Stay tuned!

How To Find DBID in NOMOUNT State - 18-Oct-2017 02:37 - Skant Gupta
Oracle Database identifier in short DBID is an internal, unique identifier for an Oracle database. Database administrator must note down the DBID in safe place, so that any miss-happening to the database could be easily identified and recovered. In case it is required to recover SPFILE or control file from autobackup, such as disaster recovery, you will need to set DBID. So lets see how to get DBID in NOMOUNT State.
Why DBID is important? 
  • It is an unique identifier for a database.
  • In case of backup and recovery RMAN distinguishes databases by DBID.
  • When DBID of a database is changed, all previous backups and archived logs of the database become unusable.
  • After you change the DBID, you must open the database with the RESETLOGS option, which re-creates the online redo logs and resets their log sequence to 1
  • You should make a backup of the whole database immediately after changing the DBID.

Let’s take an example of getting it in nomount state:

First shut down the database using shut immediate command

SQL> shut immediate
Database closed.
Database dismounted.
ORACLE instance shut down.

Now startup database in nomount state

SQL> startup nomount
ORACLE instance started.
Total System Global Area  606806016 bytes
Fixed Size                  1376268 bytes
Variable Size             402657268 bytes
Database Buffers          197132288 bytes
Redo Buffers                5640192 bytes

You can also set tracefile identifier for easily identification of tracefile.

SQL> alter session set tracefile_identifier=orahow;
Session altered.

Now, dump first ten block of datafile, because each block header contains dbid information.

SQL> alter system dump datafile 'D:\app\SantoshTiwari\oradata\TEST11\USERS01.DBF'
  2  block min 1 block max 10;
System altered.

Now find the location of Trace file.

SQL> show parameter user_dump_dest
NAME                                 TYPE        VALUE
------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------
user_dump_dest                       string      d:\app\santoshtiwari\diag\rdbm
s\test11\test11\trace

Now search for Db ID inside the trace file. In Linux you can use cat command with grep to find it:

cat filename | grep Db id

Here you can see the dump here:

Start dump data block from file D:\APP\SANTOSHTIWARI\ORADATA\TEST11\USERS01.DBF minblk 1 maxblk 10
V10 STYLE FILE HEADER:
Compatibility Vsn = 186646528=0xb200000
Db ID=3561501508=0xd4483344, Db Name='TEST11'
Activation ID=0=0x0
Control Seq=3522=0xdc2, File size=640=0x280
File Number=4, Blksiz=8192, File Type=3 DATA

In simple you can also get it using v$database:

SQL> select name, dbid from v$database;
NAME            DBID

--------- ----------
TEST11    3561501508

DBID is also displayed by the RMAN client when it starts up and connects to your database. Typical output follows:
SQL> host rman target /
Recovery Manager: Release 11.2.0.1.0 - Production on Thu Nov 6 19:59:06 2014
Copyright (c) 1982, 2009, Oracle and/or its affiliates.  All rights reserved.
connected to target database: TEST11 (DBID=3561501508)

Thank you for giving your valuable time to read the above information.

Source

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LinkedIn Group: Oracle Cloud DBAAS

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Schema and Non-Schema Objects in Oracle Database - 18-Oct-2017 00:49 - Skant Gupta

Oracle database contains schema objects like views, tables, triggers etc., and several other types of objects which are also stored in the database but are not contained in a schema.

A schema is a collection of logical structures of data, or schema objects which is owned by a database user and has the same name as that of the user. Schema objects can be created and manipulated with SQL and include the following types of objects:

Types of Schema Objects

Schema objects are logical data storage structures which do not have a one-to-one correspondence to physical files on disk that store their information. However, Oracle Database stores a schema object logically within a tablespace of the database. The data of each object is physically contained in one or more of the tablespace’s datafiles.
  • Tables and index-organized tables
  • Constraints
  • Views
  • Database links
  • Database triggers
  • Dimensions
  • External procedure librarie
  • Indexes and indextypes
  • Java classes, Java resources, and Java sources
  • Materialized views and materialized view logs
  • Object tables, object types, and object views
  • Operators
  • Sequences
  • Stored functions, procedures, and packages
  • Synonym
  • Tables and index-organized tables
  • Clusters

Types of NON-SCHEMA Objects

There are several other types of objects which are also stored in the database but are not contained in a schema are:

  • Contexts
  • Directories
  • Parameter files (PFILEs) and server parameter files (SPFILEs)
  • Profile
  • Roles
  • Rollback segments
  • Tablespaces
  • User

For some objects, such as tables, indexes, and clusters, you can specify how much disk space Oracle Database allocates for the object within the tablespace’s datafiles.

Thank you for giving your valuable time to read the above information.

If you want to be updated with all our articles send us the Invitation or Follow us:

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FINDING SCHEMA SIZE FOR A ORACLE DATABASE - 18-Oct-2017 00:45 - Skant Gupta

SQL> BREAK ON REPORT
SQL> COMPUTE SUM LABEL TOTAL OF "Size of Each Segment in MB" ON REPORT
SQL> select segment_type, sum(bytes/1024/1024) "Size of Each Segment in MB" from dba_segments where owner='SYS' group by segment_type order by 1;

 

The post FINDING SCHEMA SIZE FOR A ORACLE DATABASE appeared first on ORACLE-HELP.

In alert log I got an issue ORA-00245: control file backup failed; target is likely on a local file system. Regarding this issue, I checked the snapshot control file location on rman prompt and observed that it was on local file system. In RAC environment, Snapshot control file backup location should be on a shared disk group so that it can be visible or accessible to all RAC nodes.
Check the configured snapshot controlfile default location.

RMAN> show snapshot controlfile name;

starting full resync of recovery catalog
full resync complete
RMAN configuration parameters for database with db_unique_name ORCLare:
CONFIGURE SNAPSHOT CONTROLFILE NAME TO '/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1/dbs/snapcf_ORCL2.f'; # default

Here you can see that controlfile is on a local file system, so to fix this issue configure it to a shared location.

To Configure the snapshot controlfile to a shared disk

Connect to target database, and issue the following command on RMAN prompt.

rman target /
RMAN> CONFIGURE SNAPSHOT CONTROLFILE NAME TO '<shared_disk>/snapcf_<DBNAME>.f';

Let us take an example,

RMAN> CONFIGURE SNAPSHOT CONTROLFILE NAME TO '+RC_DATA/ORCL/snapcf_orcl.f';

new RMAN configuration parameters:
CONFIGURE SNAPSHOT CONTROLFILE NAME TO '+RC_DATA/ORCL/snapcf_orcl.f';
new RMAN configuration parameters are successfully stored
starting full resync of recovery catalog
full resync complete

Due to the changes made to the controlfile backup mechanism any instances in the cluster may write to the backup controlfile when making changes to the current controlfile. Therefore, the backup file needs to be visible to all instances.

Thank you for giving your valuable time to read the above information.

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I am getting ORA-32004 error while starting the database but all the parameters in spfile are fine. This issue came after upgrade the database from 10g to 11.2.0.4.0

SQL> startup

ORA-32004: obsolete or deprecated parameter(s) specified for RDBMS instance

How to fix the ORA-32004 error?

Cause: ORA-32004 causes because one or more obsolete parameters were specified in the SPFILE. These depreciated parameters are still in use by spfile.

Action: See alert log for a list of parameters that are obsolete or deprecated. Remove it from the SPFILE.

You must check alert log to see the names of the parameters that are obsolete.

You can also find the obsolete parameters with this SQL*Plus query:

select name from v$obsolete_parameter where isspecified='TRUE';

                                           OR

select p.name,p.value
from v$parameter p, v$spparameter s
where s.name=p.name
and p.isdeprecated='TRUE'
and s.isspecified='TRUE';

Once found, you must remove it from the spfile or pfile.  You can use alter system command to remove it from spfile.

Thank you for giving your valuable time to read the above information.

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